Home Ads

Ads

Ads

Ads

This is Jeremy, the lonely left-handed snail

This is Jeremy, the lonely left-handed snail
This is Jeremy, the lonely left-handed snail

 This is Jeremy, the loneliest snail. His story was told by a former scientist from the Natural History Museum who found Jeremy in a compost pile in London, England, in 2016.


Jeremy is lonely not because he has no friends or has difficulty getting along, but because his physical condition is different from other snails. The shell is left-handed or circular to the left, while other snails have a shell that is circular to the right.


The shell circumference abnormality is caused by a genetic mutation that only occurs in one in a million cases. This condition makes Jeremy a very lonely snail because it is difficult to find a partner to mate.


Since Jeremy's shell circumference is in an unusual position, this automatically puts his genitals on an unnatural side. It takes a partner who has a similar condition for Jeremy to be able to marry him.


This discovery attracted the sympathy of many people, especially when the University of Nottingham, England, issued a public call to help find other left-handed snails to mate with Jeremy.


As it turns out, there are two potential snails that Jeremy could mate with. They are Lefty and Tomeau, left-handed snails that were discovered in 2017.


However, instead of fighting over Jeremy's heart so they can mate, the two snails, Lefty and Tomeau, mate with each other. But this is not same-sex marriage, because snails are hermaphrodites that have two sets of reproductive organs.


Lefty managed to have a child from Tomeau. On the other hand, Tomeau has also given birth to 56 babies, of which a third is believed to be the result of marriage to Jeremy.


Experts thought this left-handed shell condition could be inherited, but it turns out that Jeremy's offspring hatched and grew with the shell circumference in the correct position.

Back To Top